Rose Garden Dilemma Part 2



Thank you all for your wonderful advice, it was very much appreciated.  I thought I'd address all the comments in one post.

Several of you suggested that I move the roses to a sunnier location within my garden but that place does not exist.  I could find homes for maybe 4 of them but all the trees on the property are huge and so we are almost always in shade.  Which is great for our hot summers but no so great for sun loving plants.  So moving them is out.




Some suggested I just pull them out and start fresh with plants more suited to the area which is something I've been considering, especially since the drought in California is so bad.




Cutting the tree is not an option with this neighbor, I can certainly cut what is on our side of the fence and we have but it is still not enough.




A few of you had the brilliant idea that I keep the ones going that thrive there and either remove or just under plant them with things that work better in that area.  I don't know why I hadn't thought of adding lavender and other pretty dry loving plants there.  I think it could really be pretty if I do that!




I will let nature take its course this spring/summer and see which ones do the best and the ones that are barely hanging on, move to a sunnier location.  I only have room to move a few but this could work.  I really love the idea of adding in other thriving bushes/flowers that could really bring life back into this antique garden.





See why I asked?!  You guys are brilliant and again thank you so much. xo








22 comments

  1. I'm so glad you've decided to persevere. In the last few years I've read your blog, one of the things that has always been clear is your love for your garden and the roses in particular. I think it will look wonderful with other flowers as fill in, and you'll hopefully retain some of the roses. Best of luck xx

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  2. Oh your garden roses are so lovely...I am happy to hear that you will persevere...they add such beauty and are wonderful to pop into a vase and bring inside your cottage...underplanting is a great idea!

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  3. I have no gardening advice, as I don't know roses well. But I felt like you were hesitant because the roses have always been there. Too me, that feels a bit like holding onto the clothes that you loved wearing in your twenties, instead of embracing the ones that look good and make you feel good now. The roses were lovely when the yard supported roses. But hanging onto the roses after the yard has outgrown being a rose yard doesn't serve anyone. I'm sure you will make it lovely.

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  4. I do not have a green thumb at all! I love a beautiful garden, but I keep mine pretty simple because I do not know how to do the upkeep. I mainly keep potted flowers and plants outside because it is easy peasy. Best of luck to you Janet. I'm glad you have so many helpful readers!

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  5. I love your ideas on your beautiful roses to add plants too ❤
    I wonder if there might be a place for a fountain or a spot for a little chair or bench. I've always loved your beautiful porch and other cozy spots you make your own.

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  6. I have a front yard with no shade at all. I would love to have a rose garden like yours! It looks so appealing, and from your photographs, it looks like you created several "rooms" or at least little areas within the space. Do you happen to have a garden plan sketched out on paper? I would love to copy it. Maybe you could feel better about the changes in your garden if you knew it was being replanted halfway across the continent?

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  7. Hi Janet, my name/URL comment seems to disappear! Oh no! Anyway, lavender may not work there because it needs 6+ hours of sun. However if you head to the nursery if you just look at where the plants are in the shade that tells you they will thrive there. Nurseries always put their florals where they work best so that helps me when I am buying. Also I bought a David Austin rose and it said it prefers shade so maybe look for your zone and roses that thrive in shade :) They are out there! xx Diana

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    Replies
    1. Exactly what I was going to say. But there are native dry shade plants - you wouldn't want to plant some of them with roses though, as the roots might rot.

      I recommend you look at this great website. A California native plant nursery with deep love and history in the space. www.laspilitas.com. Even if you don't change a thing, I find reading about these plants deeply calming.

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  8. I love your plan! If you have room anywhere, I highly recommend limelight hydrangeas. They need less sun than roses and the blooms are stunning. The can get pretty large, but are totally worth the space in the garden.

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  9. Could you maybe dig out some of the struggling ones and plant them in large pots....you could move them around in the yard during different seasons for different light?

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  10. What an amazing rose garden. I hope you can enjoy it for as long as possible.

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  11. I saw the most beautiful gardens once in complete shade!
    full of shade loving huge Hostas (it's underlined. did I not spell it right?! and Impatiens all curving around and through the bases of the trees with beautiful stones and bird baths. I loved it! it was spectacular. that combination was simply lovely.
    but it sounds as if you have a plan! and that is the important thing... to be true to yourself. you will be happy with the outcome! XO♥

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  12. I found all the comments on your previous post so helpful (including tomatoes growing in a wheelbarrow!!). I wish now I'd tried to move some yellow rosebushes I planted at another house; just mourned their loss, leaving them behind. I go by that house occasionally and I think the successive owners have just let everything die or get covered over; they don't do anything to the yard and they NEVER pull out the garden hose. If I wind up moving from the house I'm in, I know now --from the comments-- that I can probably successfully dig up Grandpa's roses, which is reassuring. It sounds like you've got some good ideas now, Janet, and I wanted to say also how much I enjoyed your photos on both posts; you really do have some lovely flowers and I also find your garden statuary to be so perfect/tranquil. It's such a special spot; your little gardener's cottage amidst roses. Seriously, what a find for you and L. And you two have made it even more special with all of your improvements. It's gonna time out right, that you'll be back to yourself healthwise just about the time to start your Spring gardening. Your hard work in the garden pays off; it's a beeeuuuutiful garden!

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  13. Since your roses are old and probably heirlooms, I am glad you are keeping them. You would have great difficulty moving them anyway. I have moved old roses and some of the tap roots were as big as my arm. Some I couldn’t move without killing them, so they standed put. My roses always do better in spring and then again fall due to the heat of summer. They can go from bud, to open and spent in one day. We all have to work with what we have. They are still lovely.

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  14. To LPC: For some reason, I cannot reply to your comment.
    I second your recommendation for Las Pilitas Nursery. A wonderful resource for California natives; Bert Wilson was so knowledgeable and we all very blessed that he shared it with us. He helped me turn my water-guzzling boring weed patch of a lawn into a beautiful, blooming garden that I enjoy all year long.

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  15. Hi Janet,
    I finally became so frustrated with the front area of my yard. It’s quite small. I had tried things that looked just ok. It never thrilled me at all. I noticed there was on landscaping company by here that I admired their work. I ended up biting the bullet and having a designer come out. I explained that I wanted a very classic clean lines appearance. He had the knowledge to know exactly what would work for the conditions in that area. Beating sun in the summer. He came up with a design that I loved immediately!!! We loved the outcome so much we had him work on a very small design for an area in our backyard. Just a thought. In the end it could save you lots of money and frustration to just ask an expert.
    Best of luck...Kathy

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  16. I’m embarrassed to say this as i’m Not much of of a gardener. But what if you create a fence or backdrop out of reflective material(old mirrors) to give the heat and sun you need. Would something like that help. XO, Allegra

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  17. Should you ultimately decide to remove some of the roses, you could give them to friends who may have areas more suited to their growth requirements and you could still enjoy them when you visit!

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  18. Beautiful rose garden Janet , hope you get to enjoy it for many more years.

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  19. Thinking of your postings and who you have such an eye for quality and sharing resources. Wondering if there is a public garden or a facility (school, assisted living or nursing home) that would be able to take and nurture some of your extra rose bushes...

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  20. Janet- I know you've made up your mind on this, but I'm taking a legal class and we just covered the issue about the neighbor's trees. I thought I'd share it with you- just for your information. Classified as a civil issue- under intentional torts that affect property. "Trespass to Land" is "intentionally entering or remaining on the land of another" and includes trees hanging over onto neighbor's property. So, from a legal standpoint, your neighbor is trespassing on your land via his trees. Legally, he could be made to remove the parts that hang over into your yard (and perhaps roots that intrude beneath the ground). Again, I know you've already made up your mind, but I thought I'd share this information, just in case it might ever be helpful. P.S. In the case of our tree that was hanging into our neighbor's yard- we voluntarily removed it because the roots were causing problems in his yard. Bridget

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    1. thank you for sharing bridget. in my case it's already a tenuous relationship with that neighbor and lately we've been on much better terms so i really don't want to rock that boat. i'm excited for spring and to see just how the roses perform and to do some underplanting. again thanks for that info bc i'm sure others will appreciate it too. x

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kindness is never out of style.

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